The molecular characteristics of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) ovary defined by human ovary cDNA microarray

in Journal of Molecular Endocrinology

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorders; it is characterized by polycystic ovaries, hyperandrogenism and chronic anovulation. To obtain a global view of those genes that might be involved in the development of this complex clinical disorder, we used recently developed cDNA microarray technology to compare differential gene expressions between normal human ovary and ovaries from PCOS patients. A total of 9216 clones randomly selected from a commercial human ovary cDNA library were screened. Among them, 290 clones showed differential expressions, including 119 known genes and 100 known or unknown expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Among 119 known genes, 88 were upregulated and 31 downregulated in the PCOS ovary, as compared with normal human ovary. These differentially expressed genes are involved in various biologic functions, such as cell division/apoptosis, regulation of gene expression and metabolism, reflecting the complexity of clinical manifestations of PCOS. The molecular characteristics established from our study will further our understanding of the pathogenesis of PCOS and help us to identify new targets for further studies and for the development of new therapeutic interventions.

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      Society for Endocrinology