Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 116 items for :

  • endometrium x
Clear All
Open access

Kamran Ullah, Tanzil Ur Rahman, Hai-Tao Pan, Meng-Xi Guo, Xin-Yan Dong, Juan Liu, Lu-Yang Jin, Yi Cheng, Zhang-Hong Ke, Jun Ren, Xian-Hua Lin, Xiao-Xiao Qiu, Ting-Ting Wang, He-Feng Huang and Jian-Zhong Sheng

. 2015 ). Proteomic analysis of the human receptive vs non-receptive endometrium showed differential proteomic repertoire during the window of implantation ( Dominguez et al . 2009 ). However, the impact of high E 2 levels to predict IVF outcome has

Free access

Brett McKinnon, Dominic Bertschi, Carlos Wotzkow, Nick A Bersinger, Jakob Evers and Michael D Mueller

2004 ). Little information is available on GLUT expression in both endometrium and endometriotic lesions. GLUT1 is a ubiquitously expressed protein, responsible for the basal glucose uptake and is the most prominent GLUT in the endometrium ( Frolova

Free access

Krisztina Pohóczky, József Kun, Bálint Szalontai, Éva Szőke, Éva Sághy, Maja Payrits, Béla Kajtár, Krisztina Kovács, József László Környei, János Garai, András Garami, Anikó Perkecz, Levente Czeglédi and Zsuzsanna Helyes

cells ( Nishihira 2000 ), neurons ( Bacher et al . 1998 ), vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells ( Lin et al . 2000 ). A hormonal cycle-dependent expression of MIF was described in the human endometrium, which was elevated during the late

Free access

P Viganò, D Lattuada, S Mangioni, L Ermellino, M Vignali, E Caporizzo, P Panina-Bordignon, M Besozzi and A M Di Blasio

endometrial 1α-OHase expression could effectively result in the synthesis of the hormone from its precursor 25(OH)D 3 , verified the presence of the hormone receptor in endometrium and analyzed the functional effects of these results by evaluating the

Free access

V S Patil, G Sachdeva, D N Modi, R R Katkam, D D Manjramkar, I Hinduja and C P Puri

Introduction The endometrium is a highly dynamic tissue with a remarkable ability to change its form and function in response to various stimuli such as hormones, an implanting conceptus, contraceptives, receptor modulators

Free access

S Bauersachs, S E Ulbrich, K Gross, S E M Schmidt, H H D Meyer, R Einspanier, H Wenigerkind, M Vermehren, H Blum, F Sinowatz and E Wolf

Introduction During the sexual/oestrous cycle characteristic changes occur in the bovine endometrium regarding its composition and differentiation status. These changes are mainly regulated by the hormones progesterone (P 4

Free access

Olivier Sandra, Isabelle Bataillon, Pascale Roux, Jacques Martal, Gilles Charpigny, Pierrette Reinaud, Philippe Bolifraud, Guy Germain and Kaïs H Al-Gubory

Introduction A tightly regulated communication between the conceptus (the embryo or foetus and associated membranes) and the endometrium is necessary for the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy ( Paria et al. 2002 ). To be

Restricted access

C. Azuma, F. Saji, T. Kimura, Y. Tokugawa, M. Takemura, Y. Samejima and O. Tanizawa

ABSTRACT

We investigated the biological effects of sex-steroid hormones, secreted from the corpus luteum and placenta, on the induction of mRNAs encoding macrophage colony-stimulating factor (MCSF) and c-fms proto-oncogene (MCSF receptor) in human endometrium. RNA was extracted from the placenta and endometrium of both pregnant and non-pregnant women, and Northern blot analysis was performed on poly(A)+ RNA using MCSF or c-fms proto-oncogene cDNA as the probe. Results showed: (1) that MCSF mRNA was expressed in the placenta and endometrium of the pregnant uterus, (2) that c-fms proto-oncogene mRNA was also expressed in the placenta and endometrium of the pregnant uterus, and (3) that exogenous sex-steroid hormones could induce the expression of MCSF and c-fms proto-oncogene mRNAs in the endometrium of non-pregnant women. These results indicate that sex-steroid hormones secreted by the corpus luteum and/or placenta influence endometrial and placental growth and differentiation via a mechanism of action involving local production of MCSF and its receptor.

Restricted access

S. D. Morley, W. Meyerhof, J. Schwarz and D. Richter

ABSTRACT

Synthesis of the uterine receptor for the hypothalamic hormone oxytocin has been induced in oocytes from Xenopus laevis previously primed with bovine endometrium mRNA. The injected oocytes responded to oxytocin by showing dose-dependent oscillations in membrane currents as recorded by the voltage-clamp method. The response was specific in that it was not elicited by several other peptides tested. The oxytocin-induced membrane changes were suppressed when oocytes were pretreated with an oxytocin receptor antagonist.

Free access

E Karteris, N Papadopoulou, DK Grammatopoulos and EW Hillhouse

Corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) has been identified in several peripheral tissues, including the female reproductive organs. CRH is expressed in the placenta, myometrium, epithelial endometrium and the endometrial stromal cells at all phases of the menstrual cycle. Similarly, CRH receptors are present in pregnant and non-pregnant myometrium, placenta and endometrium. Putative roles of CRH in the endometrium include involvement in implantation, decidualisation and maintenance of pregnancy. In this study we sought to investigate in detail the CRH receptor repertoire expressed in the human endometrium and their signalling characteristics. Using RT-PCR we were able to demonstrate the expression of CRH receptor 1alpha (CRH-R1alpha) and CRH-R2alpha in the human endometrium. CRH-R1beta was present in 40% of endometrial cDNAs examined. No apparent expression of CRH-R2beta, CRH-R2gamma or any other CRH-R1 splice variants was detected. Chemical cross-linking studies with 125I-ovine CRH revealed that the endometrial CRH receptor has a molecular weight of 45 kDa. Using the non-hydrolysable photoreactive analogue [alpha-32P]GTP-azidoanilide and peptide antisera raised against G-protein alpha-subunits, we then studied coupling of endometrial CRH receptors to G proteins. Treatment of endometrial membranes with human CRH (100 nM) increased the labelling of Gq and Gs, but not Gi or Go. These results were supported by experiments in epithelial cells of the non-pregnant human endometrium in the secretory phase which showed that CRH induced increases in both cAMP and inositol trisphosphate levels. These results suggested that CRH may exert multiple effects in the human endometrium via distinct signalling cascades. These events are possibly mediated via different receptor subtypes.