Search Results

You are looking at 101 - 110 of 272 items for :

Clear All
Free access

Samantha Gardner, Emmanouil Stavrou, Patricia E Rischitor, Elena Faccenda and Adam J Pawson

adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase A pathway . Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology 181 15 – 26 . Chesire DR Isaacs WB 2003 β-Catenin signaling in prostate cancer: an early perspective . Endocrine-Related Cancer 10 537 – 560 . Cook D

Free access

Paul A Foster and Jonathan Wolf Mueller

STS activity. Many cancers, in particular breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer, have all been shown to have higher STS activity compared to non-malignant tissue. Factors that decrease STS activity include mutations in the SUMF1 gene leading to

Free access

James W Antoon, William D Meacham, Melyssa R Bratton, Evelyn M Slaughter, Lyndsay V Rhodes, Hasina B Ashe, Thomas E Wiese, Matthew E Burow and Barbara S Beckman

, tumorigenesis and survival in many solid tumor cancers, including breast and prostate ( Taha et al . 2006 , Hannun & Obeid 2008 ). Recent studies on the role of SK/S1P in breast cancer suggest this signaling pathway is important in promoting tumorigenesis

Free access

Magda A Meester-Smoor, Anco C Molijn, Yixian Zhao, Nicole A Groen, Cora A H Groffen, Merel Boogaard, Diny van Dalsum-Verbiest, Gerard C Grosveld and Ellen C Zwarthoff

5 expression with cancer. IGFBP5 was shown to be able to stimulate growth of prostate cancer cells in vitro and tumor growth in vivo ( Miyake et al. 2000 a , b ). Both inhibition and induction of apoptosis have been described in breast cancer

Free access

Klaus W Frommer, Katharina Reichenmiller, Burkhardt S Schutt, Andreas Hoeflich, Michael B Ranke, Gabriele Dodt and Martin W Elmlinger

al. 2005 ), as well as IGF BP-2 treated LAPC-4 prostate cancer cells ( Moore et al. 2003 ), IGFBP-2 is clearly a pro-proliferative factor. In contrast, inhibition of proliferation occurred in IGFBP-2-treated fetal podocytes ( Bridgewater & Matsell

Free access

Philippa Davies, Kate Watt, Sharon M Kelly, Caroline Clark, Nicholas C Price and Iain J McEwan

Introduction The androgen receptor (AR) is thought to be the sole mediator of the actions of the steroid hormones testosterone and dihydrotestosterone in male reproductive tissues, such as the testes, epididymis and prostate (reviewed in Choong

Free access

S Zhang, X Li, R Burghardt, R Smith III and S H Safe

associated with an increased risk of prostate and colon cancers ( Chan et al. 1998 , Cohen 1998 , Wolk et al. 1998 , Ma et al. 1999 ). The mitogenic activity of IGF-I and interactions between growth factor and estrogen receptor (ER) signaling

Free access

Alessandro Peri and Mario Serio

), the thyroid gland ( Greeve et al . 2000 ), the prostate ( Dong et al . 2005 , Hendriksen et al . 2006 , Biancolella et al . 2007 , Bonaccorsi et al . 2008 ), the ovary ( Greeve et al . 2000 , Fuller et al . 2005 ), and the testis ( Greeve

Free access

Inga K Johnsen and Felix Beuschlein

-regulated in prostate ( Horvath et al . 2004 ) and in colorectal cancer ( Loh et al . 2008 ), whereas other members are up-regulated, such as BMP-4 in colorectal tumours or BMP-2 in non-small cell lung carcinomas ( Langenfeld et al . 2003 , Nosho et al

Free access

Lin Xiao, Suzana Kovac, Mike Chang, Arthur Shulkes, Graham S Baldwin and Oneel Patel

upregulation. Subjects and methods Cell culture Human gastric (AGS) and prostate (LNCaP) adenocarcinoma cells were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium. The mouse colorectal cancer (MoCR) cell line used was harvested from a dimethylhydrazine-induced colon carcinoma in