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J. M. Johnston
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D. F. Wood
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E. A. Bolaji
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D. G. Johnston
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ABSTRACT

Some pituitary tumours respond to dopamine by decreasing the release of prolactin and/or GH and by inhibition of tumour growth. Certain tumours are unresponsive. Dopamine D2 receptor high-affinity binding is impaired in these tumours, and the rat GH3 cell line behaves in a similar way. The hypothesis that the dopamine-binding defect results from impaired D2 receptor gene expression has been tested in the present study. On Northern blots, D2 receptor mRNA was present in both normal rat pituitary cells and in GH3 cells. Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis identified a putative D2 receptor protein in normal and GH3 cell membranes. The lack of effect of dopamine in GH3 cells does not reflect the absence of D2 receptor gene expression.

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R. J. Crawford
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V. E. Hammond
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P. J. Roche
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P. D. Johnston
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G. W. Tregear
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ABSTRACT

The gene encoding rhesus monkey relaxin has been investigated. A cDNA library was prepared using corpus luteal RNA from a pregnant rhesus monkey, cDNA clones encoding relaxin were isolated and the nucleotide sequence was determined. The amino acid sequence of rhesus monkey preprorelaxin, predicted from the cDNA, demonstrates that the sequence has not been strongly conserved when compared with that of man, although features characteristic of the relaxin molecule have been maintained. This structural information will allow production of rhesus monkey relaxin, leading to studies investigating the bioactivity of relaxin in a homologous primate system. Southern blot analysis indicated that there is only one relaxin gene in the rhesus monkey and baboon genomes. In this respect these primate genomes are different from the human genome which contains two relaxin genes.

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