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Yun-Qing Zhu, Yun Hu, Ke He, Na Li, Peng Jiang, Yu-Qin Pan, Hong Zhou and Xiao-Ming Mao

The follicles are the minimal functional unit of the thyroid; the morphology and the function of each follicle can vary significantly. However, the reasons for the apparent follicular heterogeneity are poorly understood. Some tissue-resident regulatory T cells (Tregs) have a special phenotype that expresses unique molecules related to local tissue and regulates the tissue functions. The aim of this study was to identify the phenotype of thyroid Tregs and the roles of thyroid Tregs in thyroid physiological regulation. Thyroid tissue and peripheral blood samples were obtained from patients with benign thyroid nodules. Microarray-based gene expression, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence microscopy, and functional analysis of thyroid Tregs were performed. Here, we demonstrated that human thyroid Tregs expressed high level of thyroglobulin (Tg), both gene and protein. The immunofluorescence microscopy of thyroid section showed that the FOXP3+Tg+ cells concentrated in some of the thyroid follicles, at the side of the thyroid follicle. The peripheral blood Tregs expressed minimal levels of Tg, and low levels of Tg could effectively induce peripheral blood Tregs to express Tg, which was independent of thyrotropin simulation. Furthermore, the Tg secreted freely from thyroid Tregs that negatively regulated some thyroid-related genes expression. Our results revealed that the thyroid Tregs was a distinct population of Tregs, which expressed high level of Tg. The thyroid Tregs regulate thyroid function by Tg that is paracrine from the cells.

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Giulia Cantini, Martina Trabucco, Alessandra Di Franco, Edoardo Mannucci and Michaela Luconi

Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs), which are currently used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, have recently been proposed as anti-obesity drugs, due to their relevant effects on weight loss. Furthermore, dual agonists for both GLP-1R and glucagon receptor (GCGR) are under investigation for their promising action on adiposity, although underlying mechanisms still need to be clarified. We have recently demonstrated that GLP-1 and liraglutide interfere with the proliferation and differentiation of human adipose precursors, supporting the hypothesis of a peripheral action of GLP-1RA on weight. Here, we investigated glucagon activity in an in vitro model of primary human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). Glucagon significantly inhibited ASC proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as evaluated by cell count and thymidine incorporation. When added during in vitro-induced adipogenesis, glucagon significantly reduced adipocyte differentiation, as demonstrated by the evaluation of intracellular fat content and quantitative expression of early and mature adipocyte markers (PPARγ and FABP4, HSL). Notably, the inhibitory effect of glucagon on cell proliferation and adipogenesis was reversed by specific GLP-1R (exendin-9) and GCGR (des-His1-Glu9-glucagon(1–29)) antagonists. The presence of both receptors was demonstrated by Western blot, immunofluorescence and cytofluorimetric analysis of ASCs. In conclusion, we demonstrated a direct inhibitory action of glucagon on the proliferation and differentiation of human adipose precursors, which seems to involve both GLP-1R and GCGR. These findings suggest that the adipose stem compartment is a novel target of glucagon, possibly contributing to the weight loss obtained in vivo with dual GLP-1R/glucagon agonists.

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O.R. Vaughan, T.L. Powell and T. Jansson

Excess maternal glucocorticoids reduce placental amino acid transport and fetal growth, but whether these effects are mediated directly on the syncytiotrophoblast remains unknown. We hypothesised that glucocorticoids inhibit mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling and insulin-stimulated System A amino acid transport activity in primary human trophoblast (PHT) cells. Syncytialised PHTs, isolated from term placentas (n = 15), were treated with either cortisol (1 μM) or dexamethasone (1 μM), ± insulin (1 nM) for 24 h. Compared to vehicle, dexamethasone increased mRNA expression, but not protein abundance of the mTOR suppressor, regulated in development and DNA damage response 1 (REDD1). Dexamethasone enhanced insulin receptor abundance, activated mTOR complex 1 and 2 signaling and stimulated System A activity, measured by Na+-dependent 14C-methylaminoisobutyric acid uptake. Cortisol also activated mTORC1 without significantly altering insulin receptor or mTORC2 read-outs or System A activity. Both glucocorticoids downregulated expression of the glucocorticoid receptor and the System A transporter genes SLC38A1, SLC38A2 and SLC38A4, without altering SNAT1 or SNAT4 protein abundance. Neither cortisol nor dexamethasone affected System L amino acid transport. Insulin further enhanced mTOR and System A activity, irrespective of glucocorticoid treatment and despite downregulating its own receptor. Contrary to our hypothesis, glucocorticoids do not inhibit mTOR signaling or cause insulin resistance in cultured PHT cells. We speculate that glucocorticoids stimulate System A activity in PHT cells by activating mTOR signaling, which regulates amino acid transporters post-translationally. We conclude that downregulation of placental nutrient transport in vivo following excess maternal glucocorticoids is not mediated by a direct effect on the placenta.

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Márcia Faria, Daniela Felix, Rita Domingues, Maria Joao Bugalho, Paulo Matos and Ana Luísa Silva

Thyroid cancer (TC) is the most common endocrine malignancy. The Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS), responsible for active transport of iodide into thyroid cells, allows the use of radioactive iodine (RAI) as the systemic treatment of choice for TC metastatic disease. Still, patients with advanced forms of TC often lose the ability to respond to RAI therapy, which results in worse survival rates. We have shown that the overexpression of RAC1b, a tumor-related RAC1 splice variant, is associated with less favorable clinical outcomes in differentiated TCs derived from the follicular epithelial (DTCs). RAC1b overexpression is also significantly associated with the presence of MAPK-activating BRAFV600E mutation, which has been previously implicated in the loss of NIS expression. Here, we show that increased RAC1b levels are associated with NIS downregulation in DTCs and demonstrate that ectopic overexpression of RAC1b in non-transformed thyroid cells is sufficient to decrease TSH-induced NIS expression, antagonizing the positive effect of the canonically spliced RAC1 GTPase. Moreover, we clearly document for the first time in thyroid cells that both NIS expression and iodide uptake are hampered by RAC1 inhibition, highlighting the role of RAC1 in promoting TSH-induced NIS expression.

Our findings support a role for RAC1 and RAC1b signaling in the regulation of NIS expression in thyroid cells and suggest that RAC1b in cooperation with other cancer-associated signaling cues may be implicated in the response of DTCs to RAI therapy.

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Leandro Nieto, Mariana Fuertes, Josefina Rosmino, Sergio Senin and Eduardo Arzt

Retinoic acid (RA), an active metabolite of Vitamin A, and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) pathways control the transcription of pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc), the precursor of ACTH. We describe a novel mechanism by which RA and BMP-4 act together in the context of pituitary corticotroph tumoral cells to regulate Pomc transcription. BMP-4 and RA exert a potentiated inhibition on Pomc gene expression. This potentiation of the inhibitory action on Pomc transcription was blocked by the inhibitory SMADs of the BMP-4 pathway (SMAD6 and SMAD7), a negative regulator of BMP-4 signaling (TOB1) and a blocker of RA pathway (COUP-TFI). AtT-20 corticotrophinoma cells express RA receptors (RARB, RXRA and RXRG) which associate with factors of BMP-4 (SMAD4 and SMAD1) signaling cascade in transcriptional complexes that block Pomc transcription. COUP-TFI and TOB1 disrupt these complexes. Deletions and mutations of the Pomc promoter and a specific DNA-binding assay show that the complexes bind to the RARE site in the Pomc promoter. The enhanced inhibitory interaction between RA and BMP-4 pathways occurs also in another relevant corticotroph gene promoter, the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (Crh-r1). The understanding of the molecules that participate in the control of corticotroph gene expression contribute to define more precise targets for the treatment of corticotrophinomas.

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Jiayu Jin, Xinhong Wang, Xiuling Zhi and Dan Meng

Cardiovascular disease (CVD), the main complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), accounts for a high percentage of mortality in diabetic patients. Endothelial dysfunction is a major causative event in the pathogenesis of diabetes-related vascular disease and the earliest symptom of vascular injury. Epigenetic modification plays a key role in the initiation, maintenance, and progression of both endothelial dysfunction and diabetes. Epigenetic alterations respond to the environment and mediate the “legacy effect” of uncontrolled hyperglycaemia early in the disease despite thorough glycaemic control in a phenomenon called metabolic memory. Therefore, an understanding of the integrated system of different epigenetic mechanisms in DM and its vascular complications is urgently needed. This review summarizes aberrant epigenetic regulation under diabetic conditions, including histone modifications, DNA methylation, and non-coding RNAs. Understanding the connections between these processes and DM may reveal a novel potential therapeutic target for diabetic vascular complications.

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Charit Taneja, Sakshi Gera, Se-Min Kim, Jameel Iqbal, Tony Yuen and Mone Zaidi

FSH has a primary function in procreation, wherein it induces estrogen production in females and regulates spermatogenesis in males. However, in line with our discoveries over the past decade of non-unitary functions of pituitary hormones, we and others have described hitherto uncharacterized functions of FSH. Through high-affinity receptors, some of which are variants of the ovarian FSH receptor (FSHR), FSH regulates bone mass, adipose tissue function, energy metabolism, and cholesterol production in both sexes. These newly described actions of FSH may indeed be relevant to the pathogenesis of bone loss, dysregulated energy homeostasis, and disordered lipid metabolism that accompany the menopause in females and aging in both genders. We are therefore excited about the possibility of modulating circulating FSH levels toward a therapeutic benefit for a host of age-associated diseases, including osteoporosis, obesity and dyslipidemia, among other future possibilities.

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Sasha R Howard

Delayed puberty represents the clinical presentation of a final common pathway for many different pathological mechanisms. In the majority of patients presenting with significantly delayed puberty, there is a clear family history of delayed or disturbed puberty, and pubertal timing is known to be a trait with strong heritability. Thus, genetic factors clearly play a key role in determining the timing of puberty, and mutations in certain genes are recognised as responsible for delayed or absent puberty in a minority of patients. Through the identification of causal genetic defects such as these we have been able to learn a great deal about the pathogenesis of disrupted puberty and its genetic regulation. Firstly, deficiency in key genes that govern the development of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone system during fetal development may result in a spectrum of conditions ranging from isolated delayed puberty to absent puberty with anosmia. Secondly, a balance of inhibitory and excitatory signals, acting upstream of GnRH secretion, are vital for the correct timing of puberty. These act to repress the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis during mid-childhood and allow it to reactivate at puberty, and alterations in this equilibrium can cause delayed (or precocious) puberty. Thirdly, disturbances of energy metabolism inputs to the kisspeptin–GnRH system may also lead to late onset of puberty associated with changes in body mass.

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Trinidad Raices, María Luisa Varela, Casandra Margarita Monzón, María Florencia Correa Torrado, Romina María Pagotto, Marcos Besio Moreno, Carolina Mondillo, Omar Pedro Pignataro and Elba Nora Pereyra

Testicular Leydig cells (LC) are modulated by several pathways, one of them being the histaminergic system. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), whose upregulation comprises the primary response to oxidative noxae, has a central homeostatic role and might dysregulate LC functions when induced. In this report, we aimed to determine how hemin, an HO-1 inducer, affects LC proliferative capacity and whether HO-1 effects on LC functions are reversible. It was also evaluated if HO-1 interacts in any way with histamine, affecting its regulatory action over LC. MA-10 and R2C cell lines and immature rat LC were used as models. Firstly, we show that after a 24-h incubation with 25 µmol/L hemin, LC proliferation is reversibly impaired by cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase, with no evidence of apoptosis induction. Even though steroid production is abrogated after a 48-h exposure to 25 µmol/L hemin, steroidogenesis can be restored to control levels in a time-dependent manner if the inducer is removed from the medium. Regarding HO-1 and histamine interaction, it is shown that hemin abrogates histamine biphasic effect on steroidogenesis and proliferation. Working with histamine receptors agonists, we elucidated that HO-1 induction affects the regulation mediated by receptor types 1, 2 and 4. In summary, HO-1 induction arrests LC functions, inhibiting steroid production and cell cycle progression. Despite their reversibility, HO-1 actions might negatively influence critical phases of LC development and differentiation affecting their function as well as other androgen-dependent organs. What’s more, we have described a hitherto unknown interaction between HO-1 induction and histamine effects.

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Eui Hyun Kim, Geon A Kim, Anukul Taweechaipaisankul, Seok Hee Lee, Muhammad Qasim, Curie Ahn and Byeong Chun Lee

Oxidative stress (OS) is a major problem during in vitro culture of embryos. Numerous studies have shown that melatonin, which is known to have antioxidant properties, prevents the occurrence of OS in embryos. However, the molecular mechanisms by which melatonin prevents OS in embryos are still unclear. The present study suggests a possible involvement of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2/antioxidant-responsive element (Nrf2/ARE) signaling pathway, which is one of the prominent signals for OS prevention through Nrf2 activation, connecting melatonin, OS prevention and porcine embryonic development. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of melatonin (10−7 M) on porcine embryonic development via the Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway; brusatol (50 nM; Nrf2 specific inhibitor) was used to validate the mechanism. Treatment of porcine embryo with melatonin significantly increased formation rates of blastocysts and their total cell numbers and also upregulated the expression of Nrf2/ARE signaling and apoptosis-related genes (MT2, NRF2, UCHL, HO-1, SOD1 and BCL-2). Furthermore, the expression of proteins (NRF2 and MT2) was also upregulated in the melatonin-treated group. Concomitantly, brusatol significantly inhibited these effects, upregulating the expression of KEAP1 and BAX, including the expression level of KEAP1 protein. These results provide evidences that melatonin prevents OS through Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway in porcine in vitro fertilization -derived embryos.